Big Red Flix 39: The Cabin In The Woods (Part 3)

Join Dave, Jitterbug and Yoshifett’s as they wrap up their satirical discussion of The Cabin In The Woods. This is part two of three, so sit back and listen to the Flix crew swwon about this movie and complain about the alternate ending that must have been left on the editing room floor. Check back on BRB next week for an all new Flix!

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  1. hillaire

    I’d love to know how Dave ended up with a picture on his profile from a pretty obscure British comedy show.  He lives in Texas, this world is mad.

     

    I’m a rapper with a babie, I got it cos I did it with a lady.  classic

     

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v…..Q2ZVWyOVRI

  2. What show is that from?

  3. hillaire

    snuffbox, only got 1 series but surprisingly good if you have that sense of humour.  Not everyones taste which is probably why it only got one series but it has some highs.

  4. hillaire said
    snuffbox, only got 1 series but surprisingly good if you have that sense of humour.  Not everyones taste which is probably why it only got one series but it has some highs.

    Probably should’ve guessed that from the name of the video!

  5. Shacks

    I will hear this podcast tomorrow at work.

  6. zombiesauerkraut

    I’ve been thinking about the big red purge button. It’s obviously satire as well as a way to give us the horror orgy we were all hoping to see. But if it is supposed to make any sense, I don’t think the “purge” is referring to the horror monsters, but rather to the staff. I’m not sure in which situation it would be necessary to wipe out every employee in the facility, but I still think it’s a more logical function of the red button; if it was meant to get rid of the monsters, it did the exact opposite of that.

    Bane-woot, Dave. Your pic reminds me of Frank Whaley, minus the grey facial hair; Do they speak English in “What”?

  7. Shacks

    I was somewhat more entertained with the movie once they got the monsters lose, but was still annoyed by that time with the movie not making sense.

    I am with Yoshi about the giant spider, not cool.

    As for the blog post that Yoshi read from (that he used to accuse Jitterbug for plagiarizing the better ending), it was wrong. You can not have the stoner not get killed because they knew he was a virgin, then it was not a F*** up on their end. Also it made me think that if they did go with Jitterbug’s ending idea they would have to scrap the conversation in the movie stating she was there to act as the virgin. The blog post did have a good idea though of her being the fool for sleeping with her professor.

    Also I have to disagree with Jitterbug about the bodyguard or whatever he was (the black guy). It was better for him to never have a moment to find some satisfaction in what he was seeing, to smile a little or anything. It would have taken him out of the movie as the audience. He was seeing that stuff happen as if they were real people. I don’t think any normal person would find any kind of humor seeing that stuff happen to real people in real life.

  8. I think the internet is rife with proof that lots and lots of people do enjoy watching bad things happen to real people. Heck, gapers-delays on highways is proof of our innate desire to glimpse something morbid. I’m not taking issue with your opinion that the security guard shouldn’t have had an attitude shift – to each his own. I do, however, disagree that some people don’t find some pleasure in watching bad things happen to other people. Hell, a huge part of the movie relies on us understanding that normal people can be lured in to enjoying terrible things. In my opinion, that’s a huge part of the theme of this movie. So, to mirror this theme, having the security guard begin to get some enjoyment out of the events (just like all the other workers there – and hence, us) would be appropriate. Just my two cents.

  9. zombiesauerkraut

    There are a lot of sick people out there who enjoy watching snuff films etc., but I can only assume that this is the vast minority. There is also a huge difference between enjoying watching someone walking into a screen door or seeing a huge Nascar pile-up, and watching a real live person being brutally murdered. I think in this movie, the nonchalant attitude the staff takes towards the murders is meant to be seen as a coping mechanism, similar to that adopted by medical staff or law enforcers, and I think there’s even a line where Bradley says that. To assume that this security guard fits into the very small category of people who can learn to take pleasure from someone else’s suffering, and in such a short amount of time, just seems inaccurate to me. Personally, under no circumstances could I ever enjoy watching a human being get ripped apart with a bear trap.

  10. To me, it couldn’t be more clear that a theme of this movie is that we (as the audience) take pleasure in watching horror movies. The staff doing this learns to take pleasure in it over time, and act as the audience to this event. The new recruit to their group is astonished by how they’ve managed to become so callous to the violence. 

    Everyone is welcome to interpret a movie in whatever way they wish, but to me the theme of this movie seems as clear as day. It’s a satire of horror films that asks the audience the question, “Is it wrong that you like watching this stuff so much?” There’s no morale judgement here, and I think the filmmakers love the genre as well – it’s just that they are breaking wall 3.5 here and winking at us. Take the movie however you want, but that’s the way I took it – and I rather enjoyed that aspect of it.

  11. zombiesauerkraut

    I agree with you that one of the themes is to bring up the question of how healthy it is to enjoy these violent scenes; in this our interpretations are the same. I just don’t agree that showing the security guard as enjoying any of the violence would work, because of the reasons mentioned in my last post.

  12. So then you agree that this is a satire and the workers represent the audience? If that’s the case, then all I’m saying is that the security guard represents a new horror film watcher, astonished that these people are enjoying such crude entertainment. Then, as he is exposed to it further, he begins to see what everyone likes about it. Having the security guard’s position on the crudeness of watching this happen falls in line with this being satire. Saying that he could never accept such a thing happening to real people is tantamount to saying that he is not in a satire film, but a real film. His motivations here are tied to the same theme as the workers. So, in other words, if we’re agreeing that the workers represent the audience of a horror film (and perhaps even the filmmakers themselves) then who does the security guard represent? If you think he simply represents a true life security guard in this movie, and his morality is tied to that, then he’s not participating in the same satire as the rest of the workers. 

    It’s not a major deal, and the movie works fine without this guy having a grin on his face at some point. However, I don’t understand how it can be said that having him grin wouldn’t work because regular people don’t like watching that sort of stuff. To me, that seems to be neglecting the whole point of the movie. He’s a character in a satire about audiences’ enjoyment of horror films.

  13. Jitterbug said
    The staff doing this learns to take pleasure in it over time, and act as the audience to this event.

    Actually, I disagree.  At least I disagree that the two main guys take pleasure in it.  The woman says at one point, “It’s a coping mechanism” for the staff to place bets on the people, but we see both of the two main guys actually look remorseful when a person dies.  And, there’s a scene right before they think all of the kids have died, when the rest of the staff comes in with tequila, that both of them look extremely somber, and as soon as the staff enters, they immediately put on their party faces.

  14. zombiesauerkraut

    Jitterbug said
    Having the security guard’s position on the crudeness of watching this happen falls in line with this being satire. Saying that he could never accept such a thing happening to real people is tantamount to saying that he is not in a satire film, but a real film.

     

    It’s not that black and white for me. If something is satire, that doesn’t mean that it needs to exclude all realism. The other characters have pretty much behaved in a logical manner throughout the whole movie, only adapting their personality to that of a satirical character when influenced by the hormone spray, hair dye, or whatever, so that’s what I expect from the rest of the movie. It does not make sense to me that the security guard would jump from one extreme (condemning the staff’s “enjoyment” of the sacrifices) to the other (“enjoying” the sacrifices himself) within a period of 24 hours. Though I understand the point it suggests, I don’t think this kind of rapid personality change is anything typical of classic horror movies, so it wouldn’t be obvious satire. The line “we should split up” IS obvious satire of a classic phrase, AND its origin is explained through the gas. To deviate from this logic would hurt the movie, in my opinion. You can see from the comments of other posters, even though we know we’re watching satire, we still generally want the movie to make sense, unless it sacrifices logic in order to address a very funny and very necessary point.

    Mike, I agree 100%. I knew I was forgetting something, and the remorseful look was it. That they turn on the happy faces as soon as the tequila enters just strengthens the idea that they are coping, not actually enjoying. They’re doing something awful that needs to be done, and in order to be able to live with themselves, they joke about it.

  15. zombiesauerkraut said

    They’re doing something awful that needs to be done, and in order to be able to live with themselves, they joke about it.

    Exactly.  I think through all of the ridiculousness of the rest of the film, they wanted at least a little bit of sincerity.  It’s funny that it’s provided by the two people who are generally driving the comedic value of it.

  16. Shacks

    Jitterbug said
    I think the internet is rife with proof that lots and lots of people do enjoy watching bad things happen to real people. Heck, gapers-delays on highways is proof of our innate desire to glimpse something morbid. I’m not taking issue with your opinion that the security guard shouldn’t have had an attitude shift – to each his own. I do, however, disagree that some people don’t find some pleasure in watching bad things happen to other people. Hell, a huge part of the movie relies on us understanding that normal people can be lured in to enjoying terrible things. In my opinion, that’s a huge part of the theme of this movie. So, to mirror this theme, having the security guard begin to get some enjoyment out of the events (just like all the other workers there – and hence, us) would be appropriate. Just my two cents.

    If we are going to judge the average person to the internet then we are all heartless and soulless animals, but I don’t think you were, I know I wasn’t and I doubt anyone would see a person in a movie that represents the audience as such either.

    Yes, some people out there are sick and twisted and like seeing morbid S**t, just the average person.

    Who in the movie was “lured” into enjoying terrible things?

  17. Shacks

    Mike said

    Jitterbug said
    The staff doing this learns to take pleasure in it over time, and act as the audience to this event.

    Actually, I disagree.  At least I disagree that the two main guys take pleasure in it.  The woman says at one point, “It’s a coping mechanism” for the staff to place bets on the people, but we see both of the two main guys actually look remorseful when a person dies.  And, there’s a scene right before they think all of the kids have died, when the rest of the staff comes in with tequila, that both of them look extremely somber, and as soon as the staff enters, they immediately put on their party faces.

    I don’t think any of them are enjoying what they do. I think any and all celebrating is either for those that win the bet, which like you said is coping and the other celebrating is for the world still being there at the end of the day.

  18. Shacks

    Jitterbug said
     

    It’s not a major deal, and the movie works fine without this guy having a grin on his face at some point. However, I don’t understand how it can be said that having him grin wouldn’t work because regular people don’t like watching that sort of stuff. To me, that seems to be neglecting the whole point of the movie. He’s a character in a satire about audiences’ enjoyment of horror films.

    That is the thing, if he is representing the audience watching a horror film then him at some point grinning or saying “oh S**t!” would be fine, but in that universe he is a normal guy watching real humans being slaughtered. So it would not make sense for him to take any of that in with a grin if he is representing the audience.

  19. Shacks said 

    I don’t think any of them are enjoying what they do. I think any and all celebrating is either for those that win the bet, which like you said is coping and the other celebrating is for the world still being there at the end of the day.

    Except for the scene where they’re all watching and waiting for the girl to take her top off. In my opinion, the movie makes it pretty darn clear that the workers watching this “horror movie” unfold represent horror movie audiences. To each his own, but I think the movie loses a huge amount of what I appreciated about it if it’s just simply a satire about horror movies. To me, this is a satire about horror movie audiences more than it is about horror movies themselves. Heck, the final joke of the movie is a play on that as the characters say, “That would’ve been cool to see.”

    Everyone sees different things when they watch a movie. I see a satire about the entire horror genre, including the people that watch these movies. You guys see a satire about horror movies. To each his own.

  20. Shacks

    Jitterbug said

    Shacks said 

    I don’t think any of them are enjoying what they do. I think any and all celebrating is either for those that win the bet, which like you said is coping and the other celebrating is for the world still being there at the end of the day.

    Except for the scene where they’re all watching and waiting for the girl to take her top off. In my opinion, the movie makes it pretty darn clear that the workers watching this “horror movie” unfold represent horror movie audiences. To each his own, but I think the movie loses a huge amount of what I appreciated about it if it’s just simply a satire about horror movies. To me, this is a satire about horror movie audiences more than it is about horror movies themselves. Heck, the final joke of the movie is a play on that as the characters say, “That would’ve been cool to see.”

    Everyone sees different things when they watch a movie. I see a satire about the entire horror genre, including the people that watch these movies. You guys see a satire about horror movies. To each his own.

    Now that I read this I see the whole movie as a satire of both horror movies and horror movie fans (or audience). You have the people watching to be able to predict what will happen (the betting), Those sickened by it, but can’t turn away (the bodyguard), the people that want to see tits in horror movies (waiting for the girl to take off her top) and then there are the players, the kids in the cabin and the monsters, all of which are a satire of horror movies in general.

     

    Now I feel like I am saying “satire” too much. lol

  21. Shacks said 

    Now that I read this I see the whole movie as a satire of both horror movies and horror movie fans (or audience). You have the people watching to be able to predict what will happen (the betting), Those sickened by it, but can’t turn away (the bodyguard), the people that want to see tits in horror movies (waiting for the girl to take off her top) and then there are the players, the kids in the cabin and the monsters, all of which are a satire of horror movies in general.

    Now I feel like I am saying “satire” too much. lol

     

    Glad to hear you see my side of it. A huge portion of why I enjoyed this movie is based on how it is a wide-reaching satire. It’s great when viewed that way IMO.

  22. Shacks

    The quoting system needs to be tweaked. lol

    I don’t know, maybe I should watch the movie again, but the satire is not what bothered me the most over all.

  23. Shacks said
    The quoting system needs to be tweaked. lol

    I don’t know, maybe I should watch the movie again, but the satire is not what bothered me the most over all.

    I think you should watch it again. If some of the plot problems is what made you dislike the movie, then realizing that the entire thing is a satire should fix a lot of that for you. In a way, quibbling over plot issues with this movie is sort of like being frustrated that Dr. Strangelove didn’t take war more seriously.

  24. Shacks

    Jitterbug said

    Shacks said
    The quoting system needs to be tweaked. lol

    I don’t know, maybe I should watch the movie again, but the satire is not what bothered me the most over all.

    I think you should watch it again. If some of the plot problems is what made you dislike the movie, then realizing that the entire thing is a satire should fix a lot of that for you. In a way, quibbling over plot issues with this movie is sort of like being frustrated that Dr. Strangelove didn’t take war more seriously.

    I never watched that movie. lol

  25. zombiesauerkraut

    Jitterbug said

    To me, this is a satire about horror movie audiences more than it is about horror movies themselves.

    I don’t know guys…if that’s what you see, then that’s what you see. But I really think that’s reading too much into it. The staff obviously represent a horror movie audience/film crew. That much is clear as they are literally watching a real live horror movie on a huge screen while they direct certain aspects of it. But the security guard is a satire of the stereotypically expositive character. Even though he asks questions that the audience wants to have answered (this is how this stereotype functions when present in any other movie), he doesn’t literally symbolize any certain aspect of a movie audience. His second stereotypical role is to be the only character to disagree with the morally ambiguous events taking place, which he does so consistently throughout the film. I fail to see how this is similar to a viewer peering at the violence on screen through their fingers.

    The betting works together with the exposition security guard in order to make the audience question the morality of the staff, so that it can later be explained to us that this is a coping mechanism. Tits are often shown in movies and people always want to see tits in movies, I don’t see anything symbolic about that.

    It seems to me that in order to make this idea of “audience satire” work, you guys are subconsciously searching for similarities between aspects of (horror) movies and aspects of audiences that are not even coincidental, but exist between movie and audience in most cinematic settings. To point out these relationships as examples of “audience satire” is to say that any movie is a satire of movie audiences.

    I’m not calling anyone out; these are just my opinions and there’s no need to take offense to them. If my sentences appear to suggest that they are factual, it’s only because I’m sick of writing “to me…” and “I think…” and “in my opinion…”

  26. In my view (I also get sick of writing that, but want to make certain that people understand I’m not making ‘factual’ claims and simply stating an opinion), once you accept that the workers represent the audience, then it stands to reason that the security guard is also part of the audience in some way. He functions exactly as I’d expect a character would if he were designed to play the part of a horror-movie-newbie. He comes into the station, aware of what he’s going to see but still wary of it. Then, when the horrible things start happening he is initially appalled, but his stance against it softens over the course of the movie. Even as it is, where he doesn’t get any enjoyment out of it, he still fulfills his role (in my mind) as a horror movie newbie – almost like an audience member that was brought along with his friends to see a movie he wouldn’t normally watch. That’s the way I see it, and it makes the movie more enjoyable for me that way.

  27. Yoshifett

    Shacks said

    Now I feel like I am saying “satire” too much. lol

    You can never say “satire” too much when discussing this film.

  28. Shacks

    Yoshifett said

    Shacks said

    Now I feel like I am saying “satire” too much. lol

    You can never say “satire” too much when discussing this film.

    You have definitely proven that. lol tongue

  29. Yoshifett

    I feel like the movie itself proves that!

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